• NEWS . 17 Aug 2020
  • Abnormal glucose tolerance linked to increased MACE risk among patients with MI

  • Patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) have a high prevalence of newly discovered abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT), according to results from a meta-analysis. 

    Data were extracted from prospective studies in patients with acute MI without known history of diabetes; AGT diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test, or HbA1c; and incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and/or all-cause mortality in newly discovered AGT.

    In these 19 studies (N=41,509, median follow-up 3.1 years), the prevalence of newly discovered AGT was 48.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.2–56.6). Prediabetes had a higher mortality risk than normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (hazard ratio [HR], 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13–1.63; p<0.001) and MACE (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.20–1.68; p<0.001). Also, newly diagnosed diabetes had higher mortality risk than NGT (HR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.48–2.05; p<0.001) and MACE (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.23–1.93; p<0.001).

    The study findings underscore the need for aggressive risk reduction strategies in this population, especially in those with prediabetes. 

    Reference:
    Laichuthai N, et al. Newly discovered abnormal glucose tolerance in patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiovascular outcomes: A meta-analysis. Diabetes Care 2020;43:1958-1966.